When I grow up I just want to be happy


Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from quantumchaology  99 notes
wildcat2030:

For a Better Brain, Learn Another Language - The cognitive benefits of multilingualism  - There’s a certain sinking feeling one gets when thinking of the perfect thing to say just a moment too late. Perhaps a witty parting word could have made all the difference. There is no English word to express this feeling, but the French have the term l’esprit de l’escalier—translated, “stairwell wit”—for this very phenomenon. Nor is there an English word to describe the binge eating that follows an emotional blow, but the Germans have kummerspeck—“grief-bacon”—to do just that. If we had the Swedish word lagom—which means something is just right—the English explanation of Goldilocks’ perfectly temperate soup could have been a lot more succinct. Or the term koi no yokan, a poetic Japanese turn of phrase that expresses the feeling of knowing that you will soon fall in love with the person you have just met. It’s not love at first sight so much as an understanding that love is inevitable. Keats and Byron could have really used a word like that. There are many words that English speakers don’t have. Sometimes Anglophones take from other languages, but often, we have to explain our way around a specific feeling or emotion that doesn’t have its own word, never quite touching on it exactly. “The reason why we borrow words like savoir faire from French is because it’s not part of the culture [in the United States] and therefore that word did not evolve as part of our language,” says George Lakoff, a professor of cognitive science and linguistics at the University of California at Berkeley. (via For a Better Brain, Learn Another Language - The Atlantic)

wildcat2030:

For a Better Brain, Learn Another Language
-
The cognitive benefits of multilingualism
-
There’s a certain sinking feeling one gets when thinking of the perfect thing to say just a moment too late. Perhaps a witty parting word could have made all the difference. There is no English word to express this feeling, but the French have the term l’esprit de l’escalier—translated, “stairwell wit”—for this very phenomenon. Nor is there an English word to describe the binge eating that follows an emotional blow, but the Germans have kummerspeck—“grief-bacon”—to do just that. If we had the Swedish word lagom—which means something is just right—the English explanation of Goldilocks’ perfectly temperate soup could have been a lot more succinct. Or the term koi no yokan, a poetic Japanese turn of phrase that expresses the feeling of knowing that you will soon fall in love with the person you have just met. It’s not love at first sight so much as an understanding that love is inevitable. Keats and Byron could have really used a word like that. There are many words that English speakers don’t have. Sometimes Anglophones take from other languages, but often, we have to explain our way around a specific feeling or emotion that doesn’t have its own word, never quite touching on it exactly. “The reason why we borrow words like savoir faire from French is because it’s not part of the culture [in the United States] and therefore that word did not evolve as part of our language,” says George Lakoff, a professor of cognitive science and linguistics at the University of California at Berkeley. (via For a Better Brain, Learn Another Language - The Atlantic)

Reblogged from findj0y  1,189 notes
fuckyeahtattoos:

My second Harry Potter themed tattoo.
It’s a nice, little (relatively speaking), Dementor with a Morsmordre flag and an interpretation on the Dark Mark.
Both the Dementor and the Dark Mark were based on various sources ranging from the movies, to Pottermore, to fan art.
Why in a lantern?
Why not? I mean, who doesn’t like a skull lantern?
Pardon the bloodiness, these were taken immediately after it was finished.
Done by Jonah @ Wintership Tattoo.

fuckyeahtattoos:

My second Harry Potter themed tattoo.

It’s a nice, little (relatively speaking), Dementor with a Morsmordre flag and an interpretation on the Dark Mark.

Both the Dementor and the Dark Mark were based on various sources ranging from the movies, to Pottermore, to fan art.

Why in a lantern?

Why not? I mean, who doesn’t like a skull lantern?

Pardon the bloodiness, these were taken immediately after it was finished.

Done by Jonah @ Wintership Tattoo.